Denmark

Summary

There is a general threat from terrorism in Denmark. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers.

We recommend that you obtain comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling. You should check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for all the activities you want to undertake. 

Local Travel 
 
The public transport infrastructure is generally of a very high standard. You can buy a variety of bus, train and metro tickets at train station kiosks and also at a selection of supermarkets. Within the Copenhagen inner city area during the tourist season you can rent city bicycles (available for a token fee). Cyclists found outside the inner city area on these bicycles may be subject to fines. Other outlets hire out better quality bicycles for a reasonable fee. Ferries are available to transport you to Denmark’s many Islands.

Local laws and customs

You should not become involved with drugs of any kind. Although Denmark is generally a liberal society, drug use is illegal and laws are enforced. You will not be treated more leniently than residents and drug dealers in particular can receive heavy sentences. You should be aware that Danish law changed on 1 July 2004 so that anyone found in possession of illegal drugs, deemed to be for personal consumption, will receive a police fine of DKK 500.

Visas 
  
Visas are not required to enter Denmark. As a British passport holder you may stay for a period of three months. For longer stays, you should apply to the appropriate office for a residence permit.
 
You should note that Greenland and the Faroes are not members of the European Union. So, although visas are not required for tourist purposes, you should obtain work and residence permits prior to entry if you are intending to live and work there.

Passport Validity 
  
You should be in possession of a valid passport, with a minimum validity of three months. 

Insurance 
  
We recommend that you obtain comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling. You should check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for all the activities you want to undertake. 

Employment 
 
You should check carefully on bona fides of anyone offering employment opportunities involving asphalting or seasonal work.

Money 
 
Remember the currency for Denmark is the Danish Krone and not the Euro.

From 15 June 2007 new legislation on the controls of cash entering or leaving the EU applies in all Member States. Any person entering or leaving the EU will have to declare the cash that they are carrying if this amounts to 10,000 euros or more; this includes cheques, travellers' cheques, money orders, etc. This will not apply to anyone travelling via the EU to a non-EU country, as long as the original journey started outside of the EU nor to those travelling within the EU.

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